Animation

Animation Is…

Blake Harris 07.30.2015

Animation is…a simulation of movement created by a sequence of images.

Animation is…a means to galvanize characters and bring ideas to life.

Animation is…a portal to a collective place of wonder, where man-made magic intersects with memory, mystery and perpetual curiosity.

It’s all of these things, and oh so much more. A lot of which is due to the storied tradition of this art form, and the masters of imagination who embraced it’s limitless potential.

To honor those who have paved the animated roads on which we walk, and to illuminate the medium’s various styles, we’ve put together this short film titled “Animation Is.”

Directed by Jacques Khouri     [Q&A below!]

Animation by Dana Wulfekotte, Jacques Khouri and Elliot Lobell

Design by Dana Wulfekotte, Jacques Khouri, Robert Kopecky, Elliot Lobell

Music by Rani Dar

Sound Design by Jared Paul

Interview with director Jacques Khouri

Note: Interview has been slightly altered for clarify and readability

1. How did the idea for this video originate?

During down time and between projects, Will Gadea [IdeaRocket’s Creative Director] asked the team to try and promote all the different animation styles that the company uses in a single, explainer video. Will wrote the script, and then the team and I worked on developing the discourse.

2. Looking back, what are your favorite parts of the video?

The overall mix of the mediums. I think the team did a great job at producing it. And I especially like how Dana (the 2D character animator) did such a great job at giving personality to the character(s) during the opening transition scenes; going from old school animation to contemporary computer animation.

3. Visually, it can often be jarring to mix different forms of animation. How were you guys able to avoid this pitfall?

The idea was to create a host character who could mix into all the different mediums and usher along the audience so they can keep track of the storyline. The team designed a character who was generic enough to translate into different mediums, but at the same time could have a good range of personality and emotion. Also by having only one host, I was afforded more liberties to change the environments around her. From abstract to representational in all the mediums.

4. You are, of course, an expert when it comes to animation. But in many ways this video is meant to serve as something of a primer for those unfamiliar with the broad strokes. So, in that respect, I was wondering what were the biggest misconceptions you were trying to overcome?  

Well, I would not consider myself an expert. It’s like writing. Nobody is an expert at writing; they just like to do it. But to go back to your question:

I think explaining how animation works is easy. What I find harder is sensitizing the general audience to understand that it is a long process; that it takes time and a lot of patience to create a believable character and environment while making it look appealing. I was really trying to undertone the idea that no matter what medium you choose, it’s just as hard as the others.

I think explaining how animation works is easy. What I find harder is sensitizing the general audience to understand that it is a long process; that it takes time and a lot of patience to create a believable character and environment while making it look appealing. I was really trying to undertone the idea that no matter what medium you choose, it’s just as hard as the others.

To learn more about Jacques, and see some of his other work, visit: http://www.jackkhouri.com/

Blake Harris

Blake Harris

Blake Harris is the author of "Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle that Defined a Generation."
Blake Harris

Similar Stories